Archive for the ‘Newsletter’ Category

Meet Kyle Hardy

Contributed by Jess Barry

Kyle first came to Windrush for riding lessons at age 7. He started volunteering when he saw others getting involved and the idea seemed exciting.

Kyle states, “When I volunteer, it is not volunteering. It is an opportunity to change someone’s life. It is such a pure and sentimental moment, when I look at my rider’s face and see joy. There is nothing more rewarding than making someone smile, and laugh, and forget about everything else.” However, the most challenging part of volunteering, according to Kyle, “… is probably figuring out a way to keep my blood circulating in the winter!”

Kyle is a sophomore at Masconomet Regional High School and hopes to eventually attend medical school. He feels his volunteer experience here will help in the future. “Two riders may have the same disability but be affected differently. What works for one rider might not work for the other,” Kyle explains. “In medicine, patients may have the same diagnosis, though they may all be affected differently. I will have to look at each patient separately, and adjust my strategy accordingly, to find the most effective treatment for each patient.”

Mandy Hogan, Windrush Farm’s executive director, has worked with Kyle over the years. “I have had the pleasure of knowing Kyle since he started here at Windrush. He worked hard at developing his skills,” Mandy comments. “Kyle is a capable, compassionate, confident young man who has developed a feel for the horses and a sincere interest in the students that he works with. He is a wonderful volunteer!”

“The sole reason for why I continue to volunteer at Windrush is because there is no better place to see compassion. Every time I volunteer, I see faces light up and barriers being broken,” says Kyle. “Even if I have had a stressful week, I can always come to Windrush and leave happy, because I was able to witness a rider grow emotionally, physically, and mentally. Along with this, the fantastic network of truly amazing people always makes Windrush seem inviting and nurturing.”

Read Full Post »

Second Chances!

Contributed by Megan Piermarini

Upon googling “quotes about second chances” in order to find just the right opening to my newest horse story based on…wait for it…second chances, I found the following:

“Life always offers you a second chance. It’s called tomorrow.” To some, silly quotes like this mean nothing, but to others, a quote could mean the chance to fulfill something they were destined to do.

If there was ever a group that had expertise in granting second chances, it would be Mary Martin and her team at NEER-North. NEER-North stands for New England Equine Rescue North, Inc., which is located in West Newbury, MA. NEER-North is an all-volunteer, 501(c)3, non-profit horse rescue. It saves horses from abuse, neglect, and slaughter, and provides assistance to horse owners in need due to financial struggles. Second chances are NEER-North’s specialty.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Contributed by Hayley Barrett

Tracy and Ben Corey’s daughters, Johanna (10) and Julissa (13), were adopted from Peru last year. Since then, the parents have eagerly learned what their girls like. Johanna loves her grandfather’s cows, especially the Christmas-born calf she named Santa Claus. Julissa enjoys dancing and all kinds of music. They both love Saige, their Puerto Rican rescue dog. Just as for them, the girls were happy to learn, English was Saige’s second language. (more…)

Read Full Post »

The Story of Puddle

Contributed by Roland (Sparky) Dudney

Puddles

Eleven years ago Darby (my Border collie) and I were asked to move some sheep who had escaped from Choate farm in Danvers. When it was time to leave I called Darby but she was nowhere to be found. After about twenty minutes, I finally found her lying next to the pond looking at something on the ground and then looking at me, as if to say “come look what I found”.

When I reached her I discovered that she was looking at an egg just lying out in the open.

To get Darby to come with me, I picked up the egg and brought it home. I told Mandy what had happened and she said that she had an incubator and that I should try and hatch it.

We set the incubator up in my youngest son Evan’s bedroom and followed Mandy’s instructions on how to take care of an egg. A short time later we experienced the joy of watching Puddles hatch out.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Contributed by Hayley Barrett

Robin, top second from left, notes she made long-lasting friendships, learned valuable skills, and of course, got to be with the horses during her journey at Windrush Farm.

In the beginning, the simple desire to work with horses is often what brings people to Windrush. That’s how it happened for Robin Forte of Boxford, MA. As a student at Masconomet Regional High School, Robin decided to fulfill her community service requirement by volunteering at Windrush. She would ride the school bus to the farm each week to work as a side-walker or horse handler for Susan Lutz’s 3 p.m. class.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

The "at risk" summer program gives troubled youngsters a traditional "camp experience" at no cost to their families and inspires kids to develop respect, compassion, admiration and empathy.

Watch a barnyard buzz episode!

When you walk into the barn, it’s a clean slate. All the past history in school, on the streets, and in the home is gone. And those things that were once important, such as your fancy sneakers, backward hat, and tough guy attitude no longer matter. That’s not what the horse will respond to. The horse doesn’t know that you struggle in school, have trouble keeping friends, seem to always be in trouble. You get to start over and see what the horse does care about. That’s what it’s like for the forty inner city, disadvantaged kids and teens attending the program at the farm.

How does it work?

(more…)

Read Full Post »

During John's first visit to the farm, he made remarkable progress, standing to hold a horse's lead rope. On the last day of the session, this formery chair-bound veteran mounted a large pony, Tucker and rode for a half an hour.

Contributed by Hayley Barrett

Horses have always carried soldiers into battle. Now the horses of Windrush are carrying veteran soldiers away from the trauma of the battlefield and toward healing and hope. Horses for Heroes, a privately-funded program, enables veterans to interact with horses as a way to build physical and psychological health.

These veterans, men and women cared for at the Veterans Medical Center in Bedford, MA, served our country in World War II, Vietnam, Korea, Persian Gulf, Iraq and Afghanistan. Windrush Farm stands ready to serve them now.

Joined by instructors and enthusiastic volunteers, the veterans learn to groom and handle the horses. Allyson Seinfeld has volunteered with Horses for Heroes since 2007. “I whole-heartedly believe in the program. It’s the love of my life. I’ve seen the transition, from initial trepidation to the biggest smiles. That’s what it’s all about.”

Felicia Hall, C.T.R.S., one of two Veterans Administration recreational therapists who accompany the group, agrees. “Working with horses builds trust. Grooming provides range-of-motion exercise. It’s a good recovery tool.” The second therapist, Joe Grimard, M.S., notes that visiting the farm is an expectation-free activity. “It creates a sense of peace and reminds them of health and youth. There are no bad associations, no negatives.”

They return to the medical center brimming with stories of accomplishment.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »